Peter : Welcome to Talking Japan. This is Peter von Gomm and . . .

Miki : This is Miki Kano. Hello everyone.

Peter : Hello everybody. Hello Miki.

Miki : Hello Peter.

Peter : Well, I’m noticing out here, outside the studio, lots of decorations are being put up for you-know- what.

Miki : Christmas!

Peter : Uh-huh. Are you a big fan of Christmas?

Miki : Well, sort of. Yeah, I’m a Catholic, to begin with.

Peter : Are you really?

Miki : Yeah.

Peter : Oh, I didn’t know that.

Miki : Yeah, but then I was baptized right after I was born. So it was none of my intention.

Peter : Oh, me too. Small world. Well, it’s kind of interesting to me, coming from America, where Christmas is a huge, huge holiday in America, and there’s lots of Christians.

Miki : Right.

Peter : A very large percentage of Americans are Christians, so it’s understandable to have a Christmas celebration there. But when I came to Japan, and I started seeing all of these decorations, and all of the Japanese people celebrating Christmas, it kind of gave me an uneasy feeling.

Miki : Hmm.

Peter : Because there’s not that many Japanese Catholics. So what’s the deal? When did Christmas become popular here in Japan?

Miki : I think it got particularly popular after the war, I guess. Before that some people, I think, were obviously celebrating the occasion, but not so popular and not so commercial as the way we have today.

Peter : Uh-huh.

Miki : But many Japanese people, and especially young people, are great fans of Christmas.

Peter : Yeah.

Miki : They just love to do anything to do with Christmas.

Peter : So does everybody exchange gifts? I mean do friends as well as family members buy gifts for each other here?

Miki : I think Christmas for Japanese people is pretty much the occasion between friends. It’s not strictly a family occasion. Well, it depends on what kind of background you are from, but people generally exchange gifts with their friends and, uh, well, parents give gifts to their children.

Peter : So when exactly is it celebrated here in Japan? ’Cause in America, Christmas Eve, as well as Christmas Day, are equally important.

Miki : Hmm.

Peter : Do you celebrate Christmas Eve as well? Is it a very important night?

Miki : Yeah, I think for many young people that Christmas Eve is the biggest deal. They go to fancy restaurants and then, uh, they exchange gifts and they drink and, and some people just, you know, go to church, they don’t really need to be Catholic or anything, but then they just want to share this festive air.

Peter : Hmm.

Miki : And then so on Christmas Day, well I think you might have seen many Christmas cakes with the prices reduced and being sold on the street. It’s because we just think Christmas Eve more important than Christmas Day — commercially.

Peter : Christmas Eve, Christmas Eve is more important?

Miki : Yeah, yeah, right. In America, many people believe in different religions, right?

Peter : Uh-huh.

Miki : So, would it be politically correct, or would it be wise to say “Merry Christmas” to every single one of the community?

Peter : No way. No.

Miki : No?

Peter :In fact, there’s always some sort of campaign every year where some religious group gets upset because they’re all categorized under the umbrella of Christianity, rather than having the distinctive Jewish or Buddhist or Muslim... They of course don’t celebrate Christmas as it is. But it’s better to say “ Happy Holidays.”

Miki : Happy Holidays?

Peter : Yeah.

Miki : What about “Season’s Greetings”? Peter: “Season’s Greetings” is fine as well.

Miki : That’s OK.

Peter: o oftentimes you see on TV commercials they wanna be very PC. They wanna be politically correct. So it’s always says, “Season’s Greetings,” or “Happy Holidays” is written on the commercial or they say it. They never say “Merry Christmas.”

Miki : Sounds a bit qpretentious to me, though.

Peter : It is.

Miki : Yeah.

クリスマスを祝う

ピーター:「トーキング・ジャパン」にようこそ。ピーター・ヴァン・ガムと……

みき:狩野みきです。皆さん、こんにちは。

ピーター:皆さん、こんにちは。こんにちは、みき。

みき:こんにちは、ピーター。

ピーター:さて、外は、スタジオの外では、例のあれのための飾り付けがあちこちにあるね。

みき:クリスマスね!

ピーター:そうだね。みきはクリスマスが大好きなの?

みき:ええ、まあね。それに、そもそも私はカトリックだし。

ピーター:そうなの?

みき:そうよ。

ピーター:へえ、それは知らなかった。

みき:そうなの、だって生まれてすぐに洗礼を受けたもの。だから、自分の意志でなったわけではないけれど。

ピーター:ああ、僕もそうだよ。世界は狭いね。まあ、僕がちょっと面白いと思うのは、僕はアメリカ出身だけど、アメリカではクリスマスはとても、とても重要な休日で、キリスト教徒もたくさんいる。

みき:そうね。

ピーター:アメリカ人の大部分はキリスト教徒だから、向こうでクリスマスのお祝いをするのは理解できるんだ。でも、日本に来たら、至る所に飾り付けがしてあって、日本人がみんなクリスマスのお祝いをしていたので、ちょっと違和感を持ったよ。

みき:そうよね。

ピーター:カトリックの日本人はそれほど多くないし。これはどういうこと? 日本では、いつごろクリスマスが一般的になったの?

みき:特に一般的になったのは、たぶん戦後だと思うわ。それ以前もクリスマスをお祝いする人は間違いなくいたでしょうけれど、今みたいに一般的でも商業的でもなかったと思うわ。

ピーター:そうなんだ。

みき:でも、日本人の多くは、特に若い人は、クリスマスがとても好きよ。

ピーター:そうだね。

みき:クリスマスに関係することなら何でも大好きよ。

ピーター:じゃあ、みんな、プレゼントの交換もするの? つまり、日本では家族だけじゃなくて友達同士もプレゼントを交換するのかな?

みき:日本人にとってクリスマスは、ほとんど友達同士で祝う行事だと思うわ。どうしても家族で祝うというものではなくてね。そうね、その人の家庭環境にもよるけれど、一般的に友達とプレゼントを交換したり、親が子どもにプレゼントをあげたりするわね。

ピーター:じゃあ、日本では厳密にいうと、いつお祝いをするの? アメリカではクリスマスイブは、クリスマス当日と、同じくらい大切だけど。

みき:そうね。

ピーター:クリスマスイブもお祝いするの? それもとても重要な夜なのかな?

みき:ええ、若い人の多くにとってはクリスマスイブが一番大切だと思うわ。彼らはしゃれたレストランに行ったり、プレゼントを交換したり、お酒を飲んだりするし、教会に行ったりする人もいるのよ。カトリックとかでなくても、ただお祝い気分に浸りたいのでしょうね。

ピーター:なるほど。

みき:だからクリスマス当日に、たぶんあなたも見たことがあると思うけれど、たくさんのクリスマスケーキが値引きされて、町中で売られているでしょう。それは、クリスマス当日よりもクリスマスイブの方が重要だと思っているからなのよ―商業的にね。

ピーター:クリスマスイブか、クリスマスイブの方が大事なの?

みき:ええ、そうなの。アメリカには、いろいろな宗教があるでしょう?

ピーター:そうだね。

みき:近所の人たち一人一人に、「メリークリスマス」と言うのは、政治的に妥当なのかしら、つまり、そう言っても構わないのかしら?

ピーター:まさか、駄目だよ。

みき:駄目なの?

ピーター:実際に、毎年、必ず抗議運動が起こっていて、宗教団体が腹を立てているんだ、ユダヤ教徒、仏教徒、イスラム教徒を区別せずに、キリスト教という傘の下でひとくくりにされてしまうから。もちろん彼らはクリスマスそのものもお祝いしないし。だから「ハッピー・ホリデーズ」と言った方がいいよ。

みき:ハッピー・ホリデーズ?

ピーター:そうだよ。

みき:「シーズンズ・グリーティングス」というのは?

ピーター:「シーズンズ・グリーティングス」でもいいよ。

みき:わかったわ。

ピーター:テレビのコマーシャルでもPCにとても配慮しようとしているよ。政治的妥当性に配慮しようと。だから、コマーシャルには必ず、「シーズンズ・グリーティングス」とか「ハッピー・ホリデーズ」と書いてあるし、そう言っているね。「メリークリスマス」とは絶対に言わないね。

みき:でも、ちょっとわざとらしい感じがするわね。

ピーター:そうだね。

みき:ええ。

>>閉じる